Accessing AetherStore from Multiple Machines in Your Network

We’ve been getting a lot of questions lately on how to access AetherStore across multiple machines. While AetherStore only supports a single Mount per Store at any given time, users can easily log into the AetherStore Dashboard to change Mount locations as necessary and enable access for different machines at different times.

But what if you’d like to go further than that? A number of users have asked:

“Is it possible to access a Store from multiple machines at once, kind of like Dropbox?”

The answer is yes, it is possible! AetherStore Mounts essentially mimic the behavior and capabilities of a typical system drive. This means you can use Windows’ Network Sharing feature to allow users within your network to access the Store Mount remotely from their workstations.

Here’s how you can set up Network Sharing for yourself:


1. To begin, right-click your AetherStore and access ‘Properties’.


2. Go to the ‘Sharing’ tab, and click on the ‘Advanced Sharing…’ button.


3. In the new window, toggle the ‘Share this folder’ selection.


4. Once the ‘Share this folder’ feature is toggled, you can set additional permissions for individual users or user groups by pressing the ‘Permissions’ button.


5. You can then distinguish permissions between users and user groups by selecting the appropriate check-box in the permissions section. You can also add new users and user groups by pressing the ‘Add…’ button highlighted above.


6. Type in the appropriate username or user group to add them to the list of users who will be allowed to access the Store.


7. Go to ‘My Computer’ on the machine you wish to enable AetherStore access to.


8. Right-click the background, and select ‘Add a network location’ from the drop-down menu.


9. Click ‘Next’.


10. Make sure ‘Choose a custom network location’ is selected, and click ‘Next’.


11. Enter the network path to your Store. Typically the format goes something like: ‘\\{Mount-Computer-Name}\{Mount-Drive-Letter}’.


12. Give your network drive a name.


13. Click ‘Finish’.


14. Network access to your AetherStore Mount will now be visible in ‘My Computer’.

Pretty simple, isn’t it? Now you can access your Store from the machine you’ve just set up Network Sharing on at any time. There are two caveats to keep in mind here:

First, be aware that regardless of location, the Store can only be accessed when it is unlocked (this state can only be toggled from the actual Mount point), ensuring the same standard of security AetherStore has always provided.

Secondly, if the Mount machine is changed at some point, the network mapping will be lost. This means any machines that had the Store mapped to it from the original machine will no longer be able to access the Store remotely until the new Mount location is mapped to it again.

That’s pretty much all you need to know to get started with your multi-mount setup for AetherStore. We’re always excited to see our users taking advantage of AetherStore’s flexibility, and we hope you guys find this information useful.  As per usual, we’re available to help if you have any questions or are in need of assistance with anything AetherStore – just shoot us an email at info@aetherstore.com and our team will get back to you as soon as possible!

Best of Both Worlds: Connecting AetherStore’s Onsite Backup Capabilities to Your Cloud Backup Solution – part 5

A cloud copy ensures you can access your data from anywhere with an internet connection, while your local copy in AetherStore guarantees fast and easy access even without one.

If you’ve taken a look at some of today’s cloud-backup options, there’s a good chance you’ve heard of Mozy, another major player in the cloud-backup industry. Naturally, we gave MozyHome a test-drive in our office and found it pleasantly straightforward yet versatile. It comes with the usual gamut of features you can expect from any robust cloud-backup solution, and we were able to link it with AetherStore without any hiccups, giving us yet another reliable means to the 3-2-1 backup strategy.

Connecting AetherStore & MozyHome:

As always, the starting procedure is the same. I have my AetherStore set up, and all my important files that I want backed up have already been moved in. You should do the same if you haven’t already done so. You can check out Shannon’s guide here, for instructions on how to set up a Store.

1. Open MozyHome

Install MozyHome and run it, then access the ‘File System’ Tab on the top.

2. Select AetherStore as your backup location

Select AetherStore as your backup location, including or excluding files as necessary, then press ‘OK’.

3. Start Backup process

Press the ‘Start Backup’ button, and that’s it!


Like some of the other cloud-backup software we tested, MozyHome was also able to go backwards, so if you’re already a user of Mozy’s software, you can link it to AetherStore and restore the backup files you already have in Mozy. Here’s how:

1. Select Files and change location

In the ‘Restore’ tab, select the files you want to move into AetherStore, and click the ‘Browse’ button on the bottom to set your restore location.

2. Set Restore location

In the window that pops up, select your AetherStore mount as your restore location.

3. Start the restore process

After setting your restore location, press the ‘Restore Files’ button to start your restore process.

And you’re good to go! Give Mozy a few minutes for it to finish the restore process. Once finished the files you had saved in Mozy will be transferred to your machine, and you’ve successfully setup your 3-2-1 backup configuration.

 

Best of Both Worlds: Connecting AetherStore’s Onsite Backup Capabilities to Your Cloud Backup Solution – part 4

A cloud copy ensures you can access your data from anywhere with an internet connection, while your local copy in AetherStore guarantees fast and easy access even without one.

If you’ve ever taken a look at AetherStore’s pricing structure, you likely would have noticed that we offer a permanent free-tier that allows users up to 25GB of storage just for signing up for our product.

Unfortunately, there aren’t many cloud backup solutions that offer this kind of freemium pricing structure, as most will offer a limited-day trial instead. These trials generally last around 7 to 30 days, which for most cases isn’t enough time to really experience and appreciate the utlity of cloud-backup services.

Thankfully, with IDrive, you have a permanent 5GB freemium tier that you can test the waters with. Admittedly it isn’t huge, but not everyone needs a huge cloud storage solution, and combined with AetherStore’s permanent free-tier, you have an indefinite amount of time to experiment with the 3-2-1 backup strategy before committing to a bigger decision. Below, I’ve outlined the steps to connecting AetherStore with IDrive so you can give the 3-2-1 backup plan a try if you haven’t gotten your feet wet yet.

Connecting AetherStore & IDrive:

1. Copy your important files into AetherStore

I already have my AetherStore set up, with all the files I need backed up sitting in there. Go ahead and do the same if you haven’t done so already. If you need help setting up your AetherStore, check out Shannon’s guide here.

2. Change IDrive’s Backup Location

Install IDrive and run it. You’ll need to add a new location to backup, do so by clicking the ‘Change’ button.

3. Set AetherStore as your Backup Location

In the next window, select AetherStore as the backup location, then click ‘Ok’.

4. Start the backup process

Now that you’ve set AetherStore as your backup location, click ‘Start Backup Immediately’ whenever you’re ready to proceed with your backups.


If you already happen to be a user of IDrive, note that the process can also go in reverse and is just as easy. You can restore the backup files you already have in your IDrive directly into AetherStore, giving you encrypted, redundant, and self-replicating local copies of your backups.

1. Change IDrive’s Restore Location

Open up IDrive and click the ‘Restore’ tab. You will be able to select the files that you want to restore to your machine. Afterwards, you’ll need to set your restore location. For me, the default location was set to My Documents, but you can change this by clicking the location the orange arrow is pointing at in the picture below.

2. Set AetherStore as your Restore Location

In the next window, select AetherStore as the restore location, and press ‘Ok’.

3. Start the restore process

Press the ‘Restore Now’ button to start the restore process.

Pretty simple, huh? You’ve now successfully linked AetherStore and IDrive, giving you a setup that satisfies the 3-2-1 backup strategy criteria.

Best of Both Worlds: Connecting AetherStore’s Onsite Backup Capabilities to Your Cloud Backup Solution – part 3

A cloud copy ensures you can access your data from anywhere with an internet connection, while your local copy in AetherStore guarantees fast and easy access even without one.

Till now, we’ve only been covering cloud backup software in our “Best of Both Worlds” series. For this post, we’ll be changing things up a bit to take a look at SyncBackPro, a popular backup and sync-tool with a variety of useful features.

Unlike Carbonite or CrashPlan, SyncBackPro doesn’t come with any cloud storage by default, so you’ll have to find other means of cloud storage to connect with. Instead, SyncBackPro’s strengths come from its flexibility and its ability to consolidate different types of storage, local or cloud, thereby increasing utility and ease-of-access. You can even set it to make use of Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive as your Cloud backup locations, allowing the usefulness of these services to stretch beyond just their conventional use cases.

That being said, for my setup I was able to link my AetherStore to both my Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive with beautiful results. Backups worked flawlessly and quickly, and the whole setup was very flexible, allowing me to schedule backups whenever I wanted, as well as giving me the freedom to choose which files I wanted to back up specifically. For users who don’t have a huge amount of files to backup, I imagine this method may be a very reasonable one, given that both Google and Microsoft offer free-level tiers to their cloud storage products, unlike Carbonite or CrashPlan.

Without further ado, here is how you can use SyncBackPro to connect AetherStore with Google Drive. The steps are pretty much the exact same if you’d rather use Microsoft OneDrive instead.

Connecting AetherStore & SyncBackPro:

As per usual, you’ll see that I already have my AetherStore set up with my most important files already sitting in there. If you haven’t gotten around to it yet, go ahead and do the same.

aetherstore-shot-crashplan

1. Create a new backup profile

Install SyncBackPro and run it. You’ll need to set up a new backup profile. You can do so by pressing the ‘New’ button on the bottom left.

syncbackpro-main

2. Name your profile

Give your new profile a name. I called mine AetherStore. Press ‘Next’.

syncbackpro-new-profile

3. Select Source and Destination type

The ‘Source’ dropdown should be set to internal/external drive. For the ‘Destination’, choose the appropriate destination type. I chose Google Drive fo rthis demo, but really you can use a large number of other Cloud storage providers as well.

syncbackpro-select-destination

4. Authorize

Press the ‘Authorize’ button.

syncbackpro-preauthorization

5. Authorize SyncBackPro within Google

You will be taken to a Google authorization page. Press ‘Allow’.

syncbackpro-google-auth

6. Copy Code

You’ll be provided with a length code. Copy this code to your clipboard.

syncbackpro-google-code-1

7. Paste code into SyncBackPro

Now go back to SyncBackPro, and paste the code into the dialog box, and press ‘Ok’.

snycbackpro-code-enter

8. Select source path

In the next window, select the Source path as your AetherStore, then press ‘Ok’.

syncbackpro-source-set

9. Run the backup

You’ll see that the profile you just created will now show up on the SyncBackPro list of profiles. To run the backup, press ‘Run’ below.

syncbackpro-pre-run

10. Select backup files

In the next window, you’ll be able to specify which files you want to backup. Everything will be selected by default. When you’re ready to proceed, press ‘Continue Run’.

syncbackpro-run-settings

11. Complete backup

And you’re set! Your files in AetherStore are now being backed up to your Google Drive.

syncbackpro-running

Simple, isn’t it? The files in your AetherStore are now backed up to your Google Drive. Rest assured that you’ve applied the 3-2-1 backup strategy to your most important files now!

Best of Both Worlds: Connecting AetherStore’s Onsite Backup Capabilities to Your Cloud Backup Solution – part 2

A cloud copy ensures you can access your data from anywhere with an internet connection, while your local copy in AetherStore guarantees fast and easy access even without one.

Welcome back to the second part of our “Best of Both Worlds” series. In the previous post of our series, we covered why the 3-2-1 backup strategy is a good idea, as well as how to combine AetherStore with Carbonite to conform to the 3-2-1 backup strategy. In this post, I’ll be demonstrating how we can connect to another major player in the cloud-backup industry: CrashPlan.

CrashPlan comes with a number of robust backup features, one of which is CrashPlan Central, CrashPlan’s online backup destination. CrashPlan and AetherStore work together seamlessly, with AetherStore taking care of local-backups and CrashPlan Central filling the online-backup role of a 3-2-1 backup strategy. Below, you can read about how you can set up CrashPlan to work with AetherStore.

Connecting AetherStore & CrashPlan:

As you can see, I still have my old AetherStore deployment up and running from my previous guide. If you need help setting up a Store, check out Shannon’s guide here.

explorer-1-crashplan

1. Copy your important files into AetherStore

My Store already contains all the files that I want backed up. If yours doesn’t already, be sure to move your important files into your Store first.

aetherstore-shot-crashplan

2. Change CrashPlan’s backup location

If you haven’t done so yet, go ahead and install and run CrashPlan. We’ll need to change the backup location on CrashPlan. You can do so by going to the Backup tab and pressing the ‘Change’ button.

crashplan-main-arrow

3. Set AetherStore as the primary backup location

You’ll see a list of drives that you can set as your primary backup location. Select AetherStore, then save.

crashplan-backup-location-arrow

4. Start the backup process

Press the gray ‘Play’ button near the top-right corner of CrashPlan to start your backup process.

crashplan-backing-up


AetherStore can also work as an add-on to your existing CrashPlan setup. If you already have your files backed up into CrashPlan Central, you can restore the backup directly into AetherStore so that you’ll have encrypted, redundant, and self-replicating copies of your files locally as well now. Here’s how:

1. Change CrashPlan’s restore location

Open up CrashPlan and click the Restore tab.  From there, select all the files that you want to restore, then manually set the restore location. By default, the restore location should be set as your Desktop. You can change it by clicking the location the orange arrow is pointing at in the picture below.

crashplan-restore-arrow

2. Set AetherStore as the restore location

You’ll see a list of drives that you can set as your restore location. Select AetherStore, then save.

crashplan-restore-location-arrow

3. Start the restore process

Press the ‘Restore’ button to start the restore process.

crashplan-restoring

And that’s it! You now have a redundant self-healing drive that regularly makes backups of itself in the Cloud.

Best of Both Worlds: Connecting AetherStore’s Onsite Backup Capabilities to Your Cloud Backup Solution

local-cloudA cloud copy ensures you can access your data from anywhere with an internet connection, while your local copy in AetherStore guarantees fast and easy access even without one.

As a worker in the industry, I usually spend more time in front of the computer than anywhere else given an average day. As a result, I’ve inadvertently ended up hoarding all kinds of precious and unique information in digital form – years’ worth of work, legal documents, personal info, and cat pictures – all priceless and irreplaceable.

I try to be mindful and perform my due diligence to keep backups of my most sensitive information in the cloud, but cloud-based backup has its limits too. In Symantec’s survey of over 3,200 companies, 43% have lost data in the cloud at one point, and two-thirds of those organizations failed to retrieve their lost data in following recovery operations.1

The 3-2-1 Backup Rule suggests that the safest way to preserve important data is to keep both onsite and offsite copies of your data. That way, even if your offsite data is compromised, you can always rely on your onsite backup, and vice-versa. Unfortunately, the costs of setting up and maintaining a NAS can sometimes be prohibitively expensive for many small to medium-sized companies, rendering onsite backups an unfeasible or difficult option to pursue.

Many of our users have chosen AetherStore as the onsite component of their 3-2-1 Backup Strategy, and I’ve received a number of requests for instructions on how to integrate ’Store with some popular products & tools. As much as I love responding directly to each email, I figured it’d be best to put out some step-by-step tutorials for each of these requested products so that everyone can get going with AetherStore.

I’m kicking off this series with a tutorial for connecting AetherStore with Carbonite, an industry leader in cloud backup and the product that the most people have asked us about. I’ll be following on with other cloud backup providers (SOS Online Backup, IDrive) as well as freeware backup tools (Amanda Backup, URBackup) and sync tools (odrive, SyncBackPro), to name a few. I’ll continue to add more guides for other products and services as you request them – just PM me on SpiceWorks or email me at ekim@AetherStore.com with your request and I’ll do the hard work for you and pump out some easy instructions! You can download AetherStore 2.0 here.

Connecting AetherStore & Carbonite:

In my original setup, I had Carbonite directly backing up files located in my C drive. You can see from the picture below that I also have my AetherStore drive set up already. If you need help setting up an AetherStore drive, check out Shannon’s post here.

explorer-1

1. Remove the link between Carbonite and your original backup target

You can un-link your original backup target by Right-clicking the target > ‘Carbonite’ > ‘Dont back this up’.

explorer-2 (1)

2. Move files into your Store

Move any important files that you need backed up directly into AetherStore. This will be your new backup target, so any files you wish to backup in the future must go here as well.

aetherstore-shot

3. Set your Store as a Carbonite backup target

Right-click on your AetherStore drive > ‘Carbonite’ > ‘Back this up’.

explorer-3

And that’s it! While AetherStore keeps encrypted, redundant, and self-healing copies of your most important files, Carbonite will be actively uploading those files to the cloud, ensuring both onsite and offsite backups of all your precious data.

carbonite-progress

It really is that easy.

Footnotes
1. Avoiding the Hidden Costs of the Cloud